In my previous blog posts I have described my approach relating to tarot research, tarot elements and symbolism, wet plate collodion aesthetics and the look and theme of my tarot. The next part of the process is to discuss the script and lettering to be used in the deck. This is about the calligraphy script that I will use for the cards and the options I have looked at.

I started calligraphy classes in 2012 with the excellent Rosana Ibarrola from Love Calligraphy  and have been going ever since. I went to these to improve my handwriting and to be able to incorporate calligraphy in my art.

My original idea was to use a lot of text in my tarot card designs. This can be seen from the mock ups above. The text was taken from the prose in The Symbolism of the Tarot by PD Ouspensky where he describes each card from the point of view of a journey. I tried different scripts from Victorian copperplate to Renaissance chancery cursive.

However, after completing my research on tarot symbolism, I reached the conclusion I wanted to include more imagery in my cards, and that the kind of text above would be distracting. So, my cards for this deck will not have any background text.

The only script I will have on each card will be the name and number of that card. I will still hand write each name and number of the cards. I need a script of the type that matches the aesthetic and theme of the cards that I discussed in my previous blog posts. So, I decided to make my own so that it looks exactly the way I want it. My first idea was to make a script similar to the 1JJ Swiss tarot, but I then felt this would not fully match the theme. At the time of writing this blog, I have not finalised the look of the script, but have sketched some ideas based on the silent era film theme.

In my next blog post, I will discuss how to bring all these aspects together to create my tarot deck design.